Cultural Heritage Events 2015/6

September 2015

Digital Cultural Heritage India 16-18 September, University of Oxford's e-Research Centre

Final programme and booking information available from late summer

 

Digital Cultural Heritage  China  30 September - 2 October, University of Oxford's China Centre

Final programme and booking information available from late summer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trinity Term Events

 

Tuesday 20 May, Meeting Room 4, Radcliffe Humanities, 4pm

Introduced by Dr Pegram Harrison, Fellow in Entrepreneurship at the Saïd Business School 

Presented by Candy Chan and Xiaotian Mao (Saïd Business School, MBAs)

Oxford Business Network Art and Business.

PowerPoint

 

Tuesday 27 May, Meeting Room 4, Radcliffe Humanities, 4pm

Introduced by Professor Heather Viles

Presented by Isobel Hughes, Head of Conservation and Buildings, Oxford University Estates Services

Looking after Oxford's Heritage: guiding principles and gifts from the past

PowerPoint

The Radcliffe Infirmary, 1908

 

Radcliffe Humanities, 2014

 

Tuesday 3 June, Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities, 5pm

Alexander Sturgis, Director-elect of the Ashmolean Museum, meets students and senior members interested in the Cultural Heritage Programme

 

 

 

Tuesday 10 June, Colin Matthew Room, Radcliffe Humanities, 5PM

Derek Siveter, Senior Research Fellow, Natural History Museum 

World Heritage Site in China's Chengjiang Province - Yunnan's exceptionally well preserved fossils and early animal life

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yunnan Province

Chengjiang locality

Chengjiang worm

 

 

Tuesday 17 June,  Colin Matthew Room, Radcliffe Humanities, 5pm

Silke Ackermann, Director of the Museum of the History of Science, meets students and senior members interested in the Cultural Heritage Programme

 

 

 

 

 

Hilary Term 2014 Events
 
Wednesday 12 February, Colin Matthew Room, Radcliffe Humanities, 4pm
Presented by Ariel Gregory
Time (as) money: valuing international heritage sites through stakeholder investment practice
 
Wednesday 26 February, Lecture Room (1st floor), Radcliffe Humanities, 4pm
Presented by Dr Paul Wordsworth
Beg, borrow or steal? Interdisciplinary approaches to medieval Central Asia in the digital era
 
 
 
 
Time (as) money: valuing international heritage sites through stakeholder investment practice
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Cultural heritage sites are increasingly valued internationally not only for their intangible universal values, but for their natural resources, potential tourist revenue and other factors. Funding for the conservation and upkeep of these sites has shifted dramatically over the past few decades. As a result, an increasing number of stakeholders are involved, and with them, a need to understand how and why these sites are being valued in different ways. Such changes are altering the ways in which interested groups engage with these sites, affecting their current stewardship and revealing implications about the sites' long-term sustainability. This presentation examines a new interdisciplinary methodology being developed for determining and comparing such values (based on ecosystem services valuation methods in Geography) and will focus on their application in current research being conducted in coastal Italy.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beg, borrow or steal? Interdisciplinary approaches to medieval Central Asia in the digital era
 
 
 
The challenges for heritage specialists in Central Asia are neither unusual, nor exceptional: unfortunately the best-preserved and most interesting archaeological sites are often located in extreme climatic and remote regions or in countries with unstable or hostile political conditions. Furthermore, with the increasing emphasis on archaeological and cultural landscapes, heritage management now involves ‘big data’ in ways which challenge traditional methodologies. This brief overview of current heritage initiatives of Central Asia will highlight the possibilities and problems of digital approaches for overcoming the substantial challenges of working in the region. Two contrasting interdisciplinary approaches from Turkmenistan and Afghanistan will be presented, in order to critically assess the impact of digital technologies on the interpretation and presentation of archaeological sites in Central Asia.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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